8 plumbing tools

8 Plumbing Tools Every Handy Homeowner Should Own

Having the right tool for the right job takes the worry out of minor home repair. Although a butter knife, duct tape and an old rag can work some unexpected miracles, having a well-equipped tool box for basic plumbing repairs such as clogs and leaks can give you the confidence to get the job done, and done right.

toolbox

The Basics for Your Plumbing Toolbox:

plunger

Plunger

1. Plunger - This is the first tool to grab when dealing with clogs in bathtubs, sinks, and toilets. Remember when plunging a toilet, create a firm seal, press down and pull up. You want to vacuum the clog OUT, not push the blockage deeper.

plumbing auger

Plumbing Auger

2. Plumber's Snake, or Plumbing Auger - This is a hand-cranked drain-clearing tool with a long flexible steel cable that's effective at clearing obstructions from tubs, showers, sinks, toilets and drain lines. Use this if the plunger can’t move a clog.

tongue and groove pliers

Tongue-and-Groove Pliers

3. Tongue-and-Groove Pliers – These are the pliers to use when you need to twist, turn, tighten or loosen something. While these come in several sizes, the 9.5” and 12” will likely be most useful.

hacksaw

Hacksaw

4. Hacksaw – This is useful to cut through metal and plastic pipe, nuts, bolts and screw among other things. Hacksaws, so long as the blade is sharp, are a very versatile tool. Make sure you have plenty of extra blades. Be careful when using it as well as when replacing the blades.

Spanner Wrench

Spanner Wrench

5. Spanner Wrench - Used for the tightening and loosening of nuts on items like sink faucets. The long shaft and swiveling jaw can get up and into the narrow space behind a sink and lock onto the nuts. Make sure when buying the moving jaw has a solid setting so it doesn’t slip under pressure. Generally with wrenches two is better than one, vary the sizes.

pipe wrenches

Pipe Wrench

6. Pipe Wrench - These are heavy, large wrenches used to tighten and loosen threaded pipes, fittings and nuts. Get two as you will need one to hold and the other for turning. Although they come in sizes from 6” to 60”, the 10” and 14” should suffice.

Metal File

Metal File

7. Metal File - this smooths the edges of metal pipes after cutting, get two: a rat tail which is round and tapered also a half round a half round which has both rounded and flat surfaces.

toolbox

Toolbox

8. Tool Box - Tool boxes come in a vast array of sizes, and functionality. Some have wheels (great feature), and some can be mounted. Always get a little more room than you need as tool collections tend to grow. Many find it best to have separate toolboxes for separate jobs. (One for Electric Work, One for Plumbing, One for Carpentry, etc.)

Jersey Plumbing(908) 281-7101

Remember! Sometimes the best tool is experience. When you need a Master Plumber to get the job done right, don’t hesitate to reach out to Jersey Plumbing Service for your plumbing needs.

older home plumbing

Buying an Older Home? Prepare for Life With Old Plumbing.

Old homes can have a lot of charm. Old pipes don't contribute to that charm. New Jersey is one of the original 13 colonies that first made up the United States of America, and we have the beautiful, and very old architectural charm to back that up. We're not suggesting that you walk away from that beautiful Victorian with the wrap-around porch and matured rose bushes.

We simply want you to be prepared for what lies in the walls of your older home. And we're not just talking about the 100+ year old homes with plaster and lath walls.

In the world of plumbing, anything older than 1960 is likely using galvanized piping. It's likely that some of that piping has been swapped out over the years, but it's important to keep an eye out for those areas that have not.

Hot Water Pipes Corrode the Fastest; What to Look Out For:

  • Listen to the water heater. Is it constantly running? That could be a sign of a leak in the system. 
  • Check water pressure. Any decrease in water pressure may be a sign of a leak. You may notice this first with hot water pressure, but cold water pipes are also liable to fail. 
  • Check the water bill. A spike in usage can hurt your wallet much more than the numbers on that bill indicate. 

What Kind of Sewer Lines do You Have?

Whether you have a septic and are responsible for the length of the sewer line to the tank, or have public sewer and are responsible as far as the hookup to the mainline (which can often be under the street itself,) as the homeowner, you will be responsible for those lines.

In addition to old age and corrosion, sewer lines can be compromised by tree roots. If there are large trees within 20 feet of your sewer line (or more, depending on the tree) you could be facing major problems in the future, if they're not silently causing one as we speak.

The longevity of your sewer pipes will be greatly dependent on what they are made of. Each of the common pipe materials have different expected useful lives, though external factors such as climate and the vicinity of trees can shorten the lifespan of the pipe.

Transite Sewer Pipes: Also known as AC Pipes (Asbestos-Cement Pipes.) These were installed primarily between the 50's and 70's, and while relatively resistant to corrosion, the technology for connecting these pipes was not as reliable then as today, which can lead to leaks and failures at the joints. The lifespan of these pipes is about 70 years. If you have a 1950 pipe, then look out for failure after the year 2020.

Clay Sewer Pipes: Clay pipes typically last between 50-60 years. They have been in use since about 4000 BC in the widely agreed upon birthplace of city plumbing: Babylonia. While you are not likely to find any Babylonian age clay pipes, it's not uncommon to find these in homes built prior to the 50's and occasionally in homes as late as the 70's.

Cast Iron Sewer Pipes: These were installed most often between the 50's and 70's and will last 75-100 years in most residential applications, so you can expect your 1950 Cast Iron Pipe to fail as early as the year 2025.

Orangeburg Sewer Pipes: These pipes begin to deform after 30 years and tend to fail after 50. Orangeburg pipe was used from 1860 until the 1972. If you have an orangeburg pipe, you should anticipate a failure in the next few years.

Lead Sewer Pipes: Lead sewer pipes can last 100 years, but they are not without their dangers. Lead pipes are gray in color and can be easily scratched with a knife. If you have lead pipes, you will want to replace them immediately, as they can leach lead into the water supply.

PVC Sewer Pipes: If you have PVC sewer pipes, thank your lucky stars. These pipes should last a good 100 years. PVC started rolling out in the 40s, so the year 2040, if you have a 1940's PVC pipe, is when you need to start worrying. (However, failure to take care of your pipes properly can always result in an early failure.

Read More About Sewer Lines in Old Homes Here. 

Preventing Leaks in Your Old Pipes

Older homes, prior to 1960 are often galvanized pipes. While previous homeowners may have replaced pipes that were corroded or clogged, that leaves many more that may be damaged or rusted that will need replacing.  An easy way to check is turn on your hot water, as they hot water pipes are the first to rust. If the pressure is low, this could be a sign of problems with your galvanized pipes. 

Other issues include:

• Old and Inefficient Plumbing Fixtures

          These may look beautiful, but everything has a lifespan. With constant use, these old fixtures will go through the normal process of wear and tear, leading to leaks and inefficient water flow. When renovating an older home, replace old fixtures with more efficient ones that help conserve water.

• Hard water – Pipes that are well maintained may last longer. Hard water does and will take a toll on pipes.

      Brass supply pipes can last between 40 to 70+ years. Copper pipes can last in excess of 50 years. Galvanized steel pipes can last between 20 and 50 years. Cast iron drain lines have a lifespan of 75 to 100 years. Lead pipes, used in the early 1900s, have a life expectancy of 100 years. PVC drain lines will last indefinitely.

You have to think about the age of the home plumbing as well as the wallpaper you want to remove. Jersey Plumbing can help with those plumbing choices so you can truly have the older home of your dreams.

 

 

The Best Prevention for Pipe Disasters is to Identify the problems before they happen, and have a licensed plumber from Jersey Plumbing Service replace any sections of pipe that aren't performing well, or that are heading for failure. Be sure to insure your water and sewer lines from the city if you have city water. It's far better to pay a deductible, than the cost of tearing up the ground from the house... sometimes to halfway under the street.

older sewer lines what to expect

Older Homes & Sewer Lines: What to Expect from Your #2 Plumbing.

Unfortunately, most homeowners have no idea what kind of sewer pipe they have, until they have cause to dig it up. However, when you are purchasing a home, there is no harm in asking the seller to disclose this information if they happen to be aware of it. If they've had to dig up a septic, have had a sewer line inspection, or have trenched the yard for other reasons, there's a possibility that they've had a sneak peak at what kind of sewer pipe you are buying.

old pipes1

If the house is in an older development, with houses built by the same builder, you can also pose the question to the neighborhood via Facebook or Nextdoor, as you likely have what they have. Otherwise, you'll have to be prepared for a number of possibilities based on the year your house was built.

In addition to old age and corrosion, sewer lines can be compromised by tree roots. If there are large trees within 20 feet of your sewer line (or more, depending on the tree) you could be facing major problems in the future, if they're not silently causing one as we speak. But the longevity of your sewer pipes will be greatly dependent on what they are made of. Each of the common pipe materials have different expected useful lives, though external factors such as climate and the vicinity of trees can shorten the lifespan of the pipe.

The Various Older Sewer Lines that Can be Found in Older Homes:

Transite Sewer Pipes: Also known as AC Pipes (Asbestos-Cement Pipes.) These were installed primarily between the 50's and 70's, and while relatively resistant to corrosion, the technology for connecting these pipes was not as reliable then as today, which can lead to leaks and failures at the joints. The lifespan of these pipes is about 70 years. If you have a 1950 pipe, then look out for failure after the year 2020.

Clay Sewer Pipes: Clay pipes typically last between 50-60 years. They have been in use since about 4000 BC in the widely agreed upon birthplace of city plumbing: Babylonia. While you are not likely to find any Babylonian age clay pipes, it's not uncommon to find these in homes built prior to the 50's and occasionally in homes as late as the 70's.

Cast Iron Sewer Pipes: These were installed most often between the 50's and 70's and will last 75-100 years in most residential applications, so you can expect your 1950 Cast Iron Pipe to fail as early as the year 2025.

Orangeburg Sewer Pipes: These pipes begin to deform after 30 years and tend to fail after 50. Orangeburg pipe was used from 1860 until the 1972. If you have an orangeburg pipe, you should anticipate a failure in the next few years.

Lead Sewer Pipes: Lead sewer pipes can last 100 years, but they are not without their dangers. Lead pipes are gray in color and can be easily scratched with a knife. If you have lead pipes, you will want to replace them immediately, as they can leach lead into the water supply.

PVC Sewer Pipes: If you have PVC sewer pipes, thank your lucky stars. These pipes should last a good 100 years. PVC started rolling out in the 40s, so the year 2040, if you have a 1940's PVC pipe, is when you need to start worrying. (However, failure to take care of your pipes properly can always result in an early failure.

 

bg

Protecting Your Pipes From the Cold

There is plenty advice out there for winterizing a home that will be vacant. But what about the house we’re living in, when the temperature drops significantly? If you’ve ever experienced a burst pipe, you know it is one of the most costly damages that can occur. There are some steps you can take to reduce the chances of frozen, burst pipes.

Preparing Garden Spigots for Winter:

Before the cold arrives, you should be removing, draining, and storing all of your garden hoses. The inside valves (bibs) that feed your garden spigot should be closed, and the outside hose bibs should be open to allow any water in the line to drain out. Keep the outside valve open.

Preparing Poorly Insulated or Non-insulated Pipes for the Cold:

Pipes that run along outside of the home or are in colder places such as the garage or along an exterior wall that isn’t well insulated can be fitted with a “pipe sleeve” to help insulate them from the cold. Building supply stores carry these in a number of sizes. If there is an extreme dip in temperature, the pipes under your sink on an exterior wall may be especially prone to freezing.

You can keep the thermostat at a minimum of 55 degrees and keep a slow drip in your faucet to prevent freezing. If these efforts have failed in the past, you may want to keep your cabinet doors open, and place an old pillow between the pipes and the wall, in lieu of pipe sleeves.

Leaving home during the winter

If you do have to leave home during the winter, do not shut off the heat. Keep the thermostat at a minimum of 55 degrees, and open the cabinets to allow the warm air to reach the pipes under sinks.

Preparing for the Worst Case Scenario

Sometimes, despite our best efforts, pipes can freeze. An unanticipated power outage or heating fuel shortage can result in no method to heat your home. If your pipes do freeze or burst, you will want to know exactly where the main water valve is in your home in case you need to shut it off.

chemical scale

Chemical Scale: That White Stuff on Plumbing Fixtures

You’ve seen it, that crusty white stuff on your faucets, or in the bottom of your electric kettle. It’s calcium, magnesium and lime scale, (just some of the chemicals in your water.) Cleaning scale off of your fixtures is relatively simple. Distilled vinegar and a toothbrush, and any number of life hack blogs can tell you how to remove chemical scale. But what if you could prevent it? Some vinegar and a toothbrush may be a solution for your faucets, but the hard water problems on the outside of your fixtures are not nearly as bad as the accumulation of scale in your pipes and throughout your plumbing system.

scale on bathtub faucet

Over time hard water deposits affect:

  • Pipes                              
  • Water Heaters
  • Faucets
  • Dishwashers
  • Coffee Pots
  • Sinks and showers
  • Your hair
scale on faucet

If you have had scale issues, consider calling in Jersey Plumbing Service, (908) 281-7101, to assess the condition of your pipes as well as your hard water handling systems. 

Hard Water Solutions for Your Home Plumbing

Reverse Osmosis Water Filtration

This system improves taste, odor and appearance of water by removing contaminants that cause taste and odor problems. It can boggle the mind how many contaminants are in water. And more importantly not all city/towns will take the extra steps to remove more chemicals than they are required to by law. Reverse Osmosis systems remove pollutants from water including nitrates, pesticides, sulfates, fluoride, bacteria, pharmaceuticals, arsenic and much more. These systems have very few moving or replaceable parts make Reverse Osmosis systems easy to clean and service.

Water Softeners

Water softening is the removal of calcium, magnesium, and other metals in hard water. Softer water also extends the life of plumbing by reducing or eliminating scale build-up in pipes and fittings. Water softening is achieved by a mineral tank.

It's filled with small polystyrene beads, also known as resin or zeolite. The beads carry a negative charge. In an ion exchange the resin beads act as the negative charge, and calcium and magnesium both carry a positive charge. The concept behind a water softener is they trade the minerals for something else: sodium. Dual-Tank Water Softeners are also available for larger families who need water frequently. As one tank is regenerating, the other can be in use.

Note: Some states and communities on both coasts have taken issue with concerns over brine backwash ending up in their ground or water supply and have banned the use of salt based water conditioners.

1 plumbing noise

One Plumbing Noise You Should Be More Worried About than You Are

Small Plumbing Problems usually start out as small noises. We all hear them, but it’s easy to ignore them. It’s not a problem YET, we tell ourselves. But they are, and they’re problems that can be solved much more affordably sooner than later.

The Not-So-Harmless Drip

A dripping faucet is easily fixable, but, quite often, homeowners ignore the sounds of dripping in their house, assuming it’s an easily fixed faucet – when in reality, it’s a pipe headed for total failure in the walls.

If you hear a leak and cannot readily assign that leak to a fixture (which you should also fix immediately) then you will want to examine the walls where you are hearing the drip.

If you catch a leak while it’s still small, you may not notice any changes in water pressure, but any changes in water pressure should be noted and addressed as well.

You may notice that a wall has become spongy and wet to the touch. If you shine a flashlight across your wall, you might see a section that is more reflective than the rest. This is a possible indicator of moisture. If you notice these things, get an experienced plumber out as soon as possible.

If you can hear a drip upstairs, check the rooms below as well. You will want to feel the walls with your hand. If there is plumbing on the floor above you, you will want to check the ceilings. If you notice a wet ceiling where there is no plumbing, you’re probably dealing with a roof leak. Those don’t get any cheaper the longer you wait either. You’ll want to inspect those immediately.

Your family may give you a funny look as you run around the house with a flashlight, feeling up walls and ceilings, trying to chase down the sound of a drip. But it’s much better than the look they’ll give you when next year’s Christmas budget is blown because you didn’t locate and repair a leak in time to prevent thousands of dollars of damage inside your walls.

reverse osmosis

A Better, Healthier Home Water Solution: Reverse Osmosis Drinking Water Systems

HERO375_ reverse osmosis

Reverse Osmosis Drinking Water Systems

There's no question that water is the healthiest beverage. And luckily, more and more Americans have stopped buying soda and other unhealthy beverages and started picking up water in an effort to improve their health. Unfortunately, many still have to go to the store for their healthy beverage of choice because their home water supply tastes of chemicals and contaminants.

What is Reverse Osmosis?

Osmosis is a natural phenomenon wherein a weaker saline solution tends toward a stronger saline solution. Reverse osmosis is a water purification system that involves forcing water through specialized membranes that remove foreign contaminants, solid substances, large molecules, and minerals.

What can Reverse Osmosis Filter?

The following is a list of just some of the many contaminants and minerals that can be filtered from water via reverse osmosis.

Lead – People are often aware of the dangers of lead in paint. But few realize that lead can enter their water supply as well, often resulting from the corrosion of older fixtures or the solder at pipe connections. Excess lead in the body can lead to brain damage, cause anemia in children, affect fertility, and cause nerve and muscle damage.

Arsenic – Arsenic is a contaminant that can be found naturally occurring in the environment, or as a result of human activity. In either form, long term exposure to high levels can result in heart disease as well as lung, skin and bladder cancer.

Copper – While copper is a necessary mineral for the body and can be consumed via shellfish, whole grains, beans, nuts, potatoes, organ meats, and other foods, an excess of copper can be toxic and may kill liver cells or cause nerve damage.

Nitrites & Nitrates – High levels of either of these are toxic in humans, animals, and especially in infants. Run off from areas where there are high levels of fertilizer or sewage can increase the level of nitrites in the water supply.

Radium – Radium is a naturally occurring radioactive substance and can be found in the water supply. A small level of radium can be processed by the liver, but after that the rest remains in the body, increasing chances of bone, breast and liver cancer.

Cyst (cryptosporidium) – Cryptosporidium infection (cryptosporidiosis) is an illness caused by these parasites. When entering the body, the cryptosporidium travel to the small intestine and burrow into the walls of intestines causing diarrhea, dehydration and lack of appetite. These parasites can come into the water supply via feces.

Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) – While a high level of TDS is rarely toxic, they negatively impact the taste of the water.

Safe Water for a Compromised Immune System

Delicious tasting water is its own reward, however some require a water purification system due to a compromised immune system. Those with cancer or other diseases that wear the body down and make one susceptible to toxins and infections can benefit greatly from the purified water from a reverse osmosis system. If you or someone in your home is suffering from ongoing illness, a reverse osmosis filtration system can help to put everyone’s mind at ease.

Delicious Water, Every Time

The most remarkable result of a Reverse Osmosis system is the taste of the water. So many of us are accustomed to the high salt levels left behind by traditional water softeners that we don’t realize how significant the taste difference can be.

Are you ready for delicious tasting water, straight from the tap? Call Jersey Plumbing Service Today: (908) 281-7101 

Winterizing Your Summer Home

Winterize Your Summer Home & Prevent Plumbing Disasters

winterize summer home

Prevent Burst Pipes & Protect Your Summer Home

The summer is fading, but what a summer it was! The fishing and boating! The grilling on the deck! Nothing is like a sunny day fading into night with fireflies flickering and crickets chirping, sitting outside with family and friends; dogs panting and the little ones close by and falling asleep.

Now is the time to think about closing up the summer place, and when done correctly, setting up for the next season in the sun, without having to replace burst pipes. 

Prepare Your Summer Home for Winter with These Ten Steps:

1. Turn off the water supply to the house. The main water valve is usually near the water meter on the home’s exterior, or in the basement.

2. Drain water pipes. Do this by: Starting by turning on the faucets from top to bottom in sinks and showers and tubs, until no water runs.

3. Pour RV antifreeze into the drains and toilets to prevent any remaining standing water from freezing.

4. After pouring antifreeze into the drains, cap them. Cover the toilet with plastic wrap. This will stop the possibility of sewer gas from entering the house through the drains.

5. Shut off the gas hot water heater. Usually this is a valve near the bottom of the heater, close to the drain. Sometimes there is a sticker giving you further instructions.

6. Turn off the water supply to the hot water heater by closing the water supply valve found at the top of the water heater.

7. Drain the water heater by attaching a hose to the drain valve and opening up the drain.

8. Drain the pool, if you have one. This is a several step procedure, involving a submersible sump pump. You may want to consider hiring a pool specialist.

9. Turn down the thermostat to 55 degrees, generally considered to be warm enough to prevent the pipes from freezing.

10. Toss out any liquids remaining in the home from the kitchen to the bathrooms as sometimes winters are fierce and heaters fail. Nothing is quite like returning to a home with surprise gooey messes about.

Regardless of how blustery the winter or how long it sometimes seems, being able to return to a summer home when that season is upon you and only having to ‘turn it back on’, ie reversing the steps taken to put it to sleep, will make your summer home and summer itself that much more appealing and enjoyable.

Worried You'll Miss Something? Jersey Plumbing Service can winterize your summer home for you. Call (908) 281-7101 

10 signs sewer line

How to Identify Sewer Line Problems

sewer line

10 Signs of Sewer Line Problems

Catching potential issues early on can prevent extensive - and expensive plumbing repairs. It's important to recognize and address sewer line problems early.

Sewer Line Problems Can Cause Significant Damage Inside - and Outside of the Home, Including Potential Damage to Your Foundation. Keep an eye out for these symptoms of potential sewer line problems to be sure you address these issues quickly. It can be helpful to have a plumbing professional check your lines on a yearly basis.

1. Sewer Blockages

If you have a backup or drainage issue in multiple drains throughout the house, it is likely that your main sewer line is the culprit, as all drains rely on the main sewer line to drain properly. However, if only one drain empties slowly like the one in the kitchen, then the issue will likely be with that drain, and may have a solution as simple as cleaning out your U-Pipe. Regular backups may be a sign of broken sewer lines.

2. Sewer Gas or Odor

Smelling sewer gas in or around your home is a tell-tale sign that there is a crack somewhere in the sewer system. In some cases, though backups and sewer odors can occur as a result of clogged sewer vents due to debris such as nests entering the vent pipe from the roof.

3. Mold Problems

Mold growth is yet another sign of a break in the sewer line behind your walls. Mold requires moisture in order to thrive. If you smell a “musty” smell, you are actually smelling the digestive byproduct of mold. Possible sources of moisture include roof leaks, window leaks, and AC unit leaks. If you do not detect any of those problems, chances are you have a failed pipe somewhere. If sewage smell is comingling with the musty smell, chances are it’s the sewage pipes.

4. Slow Drain

If your pipes drain slowly despite regular attempts to clear the lines through traditional methods (do not use chemicals for this problem as they can lead to the breakdown of your pipes.) If clearing the lines does not work there is a good chance that broken pipes or root intrusion are the culprit. A sag or belly occurring along the line can also lead to slow draining and will lead to an eventual failure and should be addressed by a plumber

5. Really Green, Lush Patches of Grass

A good sign of a sewage leak is very lush, bright green grass. Remember that sewage acts as a fertilizer and gives the surrounding area extra nutrients resulting in a very lush appearance. As pretty as that area of your lawn may be, the cause is decidedly un-pretty.

6. Indentation In Lawn or Under Pavers

A cracked sewer main can allow soil to dissipate as the ground is always getting saturated because of seepage. This will cause your walkway or lawn to sink and appear as a dip above the pipeline.

7. Foundation Cracks & Leaks

In addition to the creation of sinkholes, seepage from sewer line breaks can drain directly toward your foundation, and left unaddressed, will cause cracks and leaks in the foundation. This is one of the worst case scenarios of a neglected sewer line, and one of the main reasons to have your sewer checked regularly by a plumbing specialist.

8. Sewer or Septic Waste Pooling in Yard

This issue may be a broken or damaged septic tank, clogged drain fields, or again a cracked main pipeline. This is not what you want to have on your lawn.

9. Rodent Issues

Yes, rats. The problem can start with a rat or three entering your sewer line from the city/town line pipes that tie in to your home’s lines. Rats need very little space to crawl in, and once in, generally are annoying to get rid of.

10. Insect Infestation

If your sewer lines are compromised, any number of insects will opt to enter them, cockroaches among them. If pest control doesn’t contain the insect issues, calling on a certified plumbing expert to check your lines needs to be considered.

Jersey Plumbing Service serves Middlesex, Morris, Mercer, Hunterdon, Essex, Union, and Somerset Counties, New Jersey. If you are in one of these NJ Counties, and suspect you may have a broken sewer line, please do not hesitate to call us!

Jersey Plumbing Service
(908) 281-7101

how to unclog your sink trap

My Sink Won’t Drain When I Plunge it – How Do I Unclog the Sink Trap?

We’ve all been there. We notice the sink draining more and more slowly. We find ourselves having to plunge it from time to time. Most of the time, one plunge does the trick and we’re back to full-speed draining and washing dishes like normal.
Sometimes, though, things don’t go back to normal after a plunge. At times like these – you don’t necessarily have to rush to call a plumber. If you’re a little bit handy, cleaning out your sink trap can be an affordable way to solve the problem.
Your sink trap is a U-shaped pipe under the sink. The shape of this pipe is extremely beneficial to your nostrils, as it helps keep the stink of your sewage from creeping into your kitchen or bathroom. Unfortunately, the shape also makes it easier for gunk to accumulate.

What You Need:

    • Bucket or Dish Pan (depending on how much room you have under your U Pipe)
    • Cleaning Brush
    • Optional: Old clothes that you don’t mind getting dirty, and a soft knee pad to protect your joints.

First, you will want to clean out under the sink and place your bucket/dish pan underneath the U-pipe.
Next, you will notice there are two slip joints at each end of the U (or J) shape. These can be unscrewed (carefully) by hand.
Let the debris spill out of the U joint and into the bucket. Take your brush and clean out the clog.
Reattach the sink trap and run the water, slowly at first to check for leaks, then more quickly to verify there are no leaks where you were working.
Once you have confirmed that there are no leaks, let your water flow a while to see if your drainage problem is solved. If there is a blockage further down the line, it may take a minute for the water to back up through the pipe, so be sure the sink trap was the problem before calling it a day.
If you find that your sink trap was not the source of the problem, and that you still have drainage issues, then you’ll know that a plumber is your next best step. Keep in mind that harsh chemicals that are advertised to clean your drains can cause damage to your pipes – and damaged pipes can cost you a lot of money in residual repairs.
It’s best to either snake the line or call Jersey Plumbing Service to get your drains flowing the way they were meant to.

Jersey Plumbing Service
PO Box 7371
Hillsborough, NJ 08844
Click to Email Us
Fax: 1-908-647-1517

Copyright © 2018 All Rights Reserved
Site Designed & Managed by Lattice Marketing